Classes and Charity

I cannot believe that we have almost reached the end of May! Wow, how time flies! Almost half the year gone already!

During the spring, the team and I have been busy in the kitchen preparing food for gala dinners, weddings and other big events. There is never a dull moment!

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Many diners got the chance to sample my Nhem as an amuse bouche, I even added slices of Som Moo, just like “at home”.

Another traditional classic, Larb Gai has also been served up, this time I added quinoa to the recipe. The texture is almost rice-like and it absorbs and compliments the flavour of the chicken salad. It looks like I´ll be serving more of this pretty soon.

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Our chicken supplier had thrown in a few boxes of chicken livers and hearts for free (how nice of him!). The latter was served up for the staff (yum yum) and the livers went in to a terrine.

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I also added some quail eggs and for a decadent touch some chunks of foie gras were also included. I like to use Pho stock to set my terrines as I think it lends another dimension to the dish.

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Another thing that had kept me busy was giving culinary classes. For the first time the swinging doors that separate the kitchen from the dining room were open to our hotel guests.

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Giving classes is not an easy thing, I take off my hat and salute all teachers around the world!

Great fun was had by all and I hope that the participants left the two day course with some knowledge and above all, a good experience.

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I also arranged an Introduction to Wine Tasting as well as Dining Etiquette. So much to teach within a short weekend! I´ll definitely organise another one of these events later in the year.

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One dish that I showed the class was my new Lao Salad 2011.

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This dish consists of all the ingredients found in a typical Laotian salad. The egg has been cooked at 62.5 degrees for 45 minutes and sits on top of sauteed ground pork that has been mixed with homemade Honey Coated Peanuts which adds a wonderful sweet crunchy texture. Herbs and salad leaves are dressed with an egg yolk based vinaigrette.

What excites me about this dish is that it will feature on my menu for an upcoming Charity Dinner Event that will be held in London.

Organised through the Young Lao Society based in London, the dinner is to help raise funds for SKL (School for Kids in Laos), a registered charity that aims to do what it is named after, build schools for children in my homeland.

The dinner will take place on June 26th in a riverside restaurant in London. Another dish that I will be preparing is:

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A Study of Goong Che Nam Pa in Textures. This is a reworking of one of our favourite dishes that has been featured on the menu since 2005 under various names such as Laotian Carpaccio of Prawns or its Spanish name “Láminas de Gambas Blancas”.

This version features raw and cooked marinated prawns as well as the “Crystal Shallots” and Nam Pa dressing and new additions like Solid Prawn Oil, Clear Tomato Noodles and Black Olive Powder.

These two dishes form a part of a special 5 course meal that will be served that evening.

The event will also feature a fashion show and live music as well as a Lao Night Market which will be selling handicrafts and textiles from Laos. There are also great raffle prizes to be won such as a 2 night stay at the hotel resort in Spain, Wimbledon tickets, private tennis lesson with British Lao tennis ace Anne Keothavong and other great prizes.

Limited tickets are available for the event for only 55GBP and all proceeds from the event will go to the charity. More information can be found by clicking the logo below.

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Please come to support us and have a drink with me after the meal! :biggrin:

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6 thoughts on “Classes and Charity

  1. I love the way make Lao food fine dining without compromising the integrity of the dishes! Really Clever
     
    TJG

  2. Hola TJG,

    Thanks for your comment.

    I also love the attention that you give Lao food on your site, especially the photos. Are you Swedish or just based in Sweden?

  3. Pingback: laocook » Blog Archive » Summer Ends

  4. Hello, I wonder if you might share with me the basic principle of using a stock to set a terrine, I have beef tongue, liver, and stock and I would love to put them together.

    Thank you! 

  5. Hello Chris, and welcome to Laocook.
    To use stock to set a terrine, you should reduce the stock and season it, depending on what ingredients you used to make a stock, you may have to add gelatin sheets. For example, if you used calf´s foot in your stock, you will not need gelatin.
    If like me, you make stocks from beef, bones and vegetables (or a Pho broth), I usually add around 20-26 grams of gelatin (10-13 sheets) per litre, this may seem a lot, but I cut my terrines quite thinly and sometimes go over them with a blow torch before serving.
    To use the stock, simply pour some of it over your each layer as you are building the terrine, once the terrine is done, make sure to cover it then press it down. Once it has chilled, the stock will set and become jelly.
     
    Look below for some examples.
    http://laocook.com/2009/02/17/rabbit-rabbit/
    http://laocook.com/2009/02/15/seabass-crackers/
     
    Have fun!
     
     
     
     

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